Acacias (wattles, mimosas) in your landscape: survey

Together with Charlie Shackleton, I am updating our 2011 global study of the adoption, use, and perception of non-native Australian acacias in landscapes around the world.  We seek to identify changes and trends in the presence of these trees and how they have been welcomed (or not), and used (or not). To that effect, we have prepared a brief online survey.

We would like to hear from people who are familiar with one or more places where non-native Australian acacias grow (also known as mimosa, wattle, mangium, …), whether they are land owners, environmental managers, scientists, officials, or interested public.

The survey consists of 6 open questions on changes to the presence, use, impact, perception, and management of acacias in a landscape you are familiar with. It should take 3 to 15 minutes, depending on the level of detail with which you answer the questions.  The survey is available in multiple languages:

English  –  Français –  Español –  Русский –  Português  –  简体中文  –  繁体中文  –  Italiano – Tiếng Việt

We also encourage you to circulate this survey in your networks (contact me for email texts in any of the languages above).  Please fill in the survey by 28 February at the latest. Thank you in advance for your contributions.


PS. By ‘Australian acacias’, we refer to trees of the genus Acacia originally found in Australia but cultivated and growing wild around the world.  Many are called ‘wattle’; they include the feather-leafed ‘mimosa’ (A. dealbata) found around the Mediterranean or broad-leafed acacias (A. mangium, A. auriculiformis, A, saligna …) in coastal and tropical regions.

One Response to Acacias (wattles, mimosas) in your landscape: survey

  1. Vanja Andrianarivo says:

    Many thanks

    Le mer. 2 févr. 2022 à 14:06, Christian Kull a écrit :

    > christiankull posted: ” Together with Charlie Shackleton, I am updating > our 2011 global study of the adoption, use, and perception of non-native > Australian acacias in landscapes around the world. We seek to identify > changes and trends in the presence of these trees and how” >

Leave a Reply to Vanja Andrianarivo Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: