Goodbye Monash

November 28, 2014

All good things must come to an end, and so it is with my time at the School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Melbourne.
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The rise and fall of geography and environmental science at Monash University

November 28, 2014

The last two years have been unpleasant for geography and environmental science at Monash.  What was once a thriving School of Geography and Environmental Science has been wilfully destroyed, reduced to a “Centre” soon to have only four permanent staff. Excellent and committed as these colleagues are, they have been marginalised and will struggle to return GES to its glory days unless the university reinvests in genuine interdisciplinary teaching and research at the nature-society interface. Read the rest of this entry »


Transplants: telling stories of humans through plant movements (blog launch)

October 29, 2014

Just launched:  a new website called Trans-Plants that asks “what can we learn about humans through plant movements, weeds, and invasive aliens?”  It is a joint venture between Priya Rangan, Christian Kull, and their collaborators on three ARC-funded research projects and on all the activities that have spun-off from there.

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PhD scholarships in political ecology

October 8, 2014

I am recruiting for two doctoral students to work with me in the development studies group at the Institute of Geography and Sustainability at the Université de Lausanne next year.   Read the rest of this entry »


Lantana, people, and wildlife in southern India (field trip report)

October 6, 2014
A lantana-lined path in the BRT Hills

A lantana-lined path in the BRT Hills

The thorny bush Lantana camara, with its attractive pink, yellow, and orange flowerlets, covers vast areas of forest understory, fallow lands, and hedges in the hilly mountains fringing the southern end of Karnataka state, India. These upland areas are also home to several marginalized cultural groups (‘scheduled tribes’, or ‘indigenous people’) as well as a diversity of wildlife – elephants, tigers, bears, gaur, three kinds of deer, monkeys, boars, wild dogs, leopards. On our recent scoping trip to the Biligiri Ranganaswamy Hills some four hour south of Bangalore, we discovered that there were at least three ways one could talk about the lantana situation, each following familiar tropes: as a story of invasion, of dispossession, or of creative redemption. Read the rest of this entry »


Peatland deforestation for acacia in Indonesia

September 27, 2014

Oil palm gets all the attention, but what about acacia?  Oil palm has become synonymous with deforestation in Indonesia and resulting losses of orang-utan habitat, increased carbon emissions, and unhealthy smoke haze.  But equally large areas of peatland are being converted to pulp and paper plantations of tropical salwood wattles like Acacia crassicarpa and A. magnum, trees that now cover many millions of hectares in South East Asia.  In Riau province, Sumatra, the two big pulp mills (operated by Asia Pulp and Paper [APP] and Asia Pacific Resources International Ltd [APRIL]) have around 75 and 45 per cent (respectively) of their pulp plantations located on peatland. The ways in which such forestry concessions have been granted and implemented have inspired dramatic protests: 28 residents of the Meranti Islands in Riau Province stitched their lips shut while demonstrating in front of government buildings in Jakarta (Jakarta PostTransparency Int.). Read the rest of this entry »


Hello Lausanne!

September 22, 2014

I’m very excited to announce that in January 2015 I will be taking up a position as Professeur ordinaire at the Université de Lausanne, or “Unil”, on the shores of Lake Geneva, in Switzerland.   Read the rest of this entry »


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